Archive for October, 2011


I am personally bringing a gun, or preferentially, a jet plane:

The training begins on 5 a.m. The fundamental of the training is to turn the entire body into steely firmness, and the basic part is training the fist.

Punching bags and such, right? Maybe crack some cinder blocks if you’re up for it?

Mr. Im said, “You would wrap a tree trunk with ropes, and keep punching it. You throw 5000 punches day and night — do that for a month, the inside of your fist swells up until you can barely curl your fingers.” He added, “Then you open a tin can and set it up on a stand. You keep punching the sharp part. When your hand turns into mush with blood and pus, you start punching a pile of salt. Repeat it, and your hands become like a stone.” Mr. Im explained, “You punch the salt so that the salt would prevent the hand from rotting away with the blood.” According to Mr. Im, with the hand trained like this “you can easily break 20 sheets of cement blocks, and you can kill a person with three punches.” His hands would naturally make a fist throughout the interview. This reporter had to respectfully ask that he unclench his fist during the interview.

Now what if I I just run you over with my car?

The way to train shoulder and arm muscles was also unique. Mr. Im said, “You would take off your top, line up, put your hands on the shoulder of the person in front of you and put your head down. And then a car would drive on top of the outstretched arms.” He explained, “The car goes fast enough not to break your arms, but if you don’t concentrate your shoulder would be destroyed.”

And you better bring some friends along…

In a martial art called “Gyeok-sul,” the special forces train by sparring each other. Mr. Im said, “Kim Il-Sung used to say he wanted a warrior who can defeat a hundred, but honestly that’s not possible. But we get trained enough to fight ten men without guns.”

Sometimes they like to take a nice swim.

In the winter, according to Mr. Im, the special forces are thrown into the sea around 4 km [TK: 2.5 miles] away. Mr. Im said, “The ocean temperature is about negative 30-40 degrees in North Korea in the middle of winter,” and said “The salt water feels like blades; the capillaries all over your body burst out, and some people just die there.”

Cool. Co-coo-cool.

Via Hunter-Gatherer, who got it originally from Ask a Korean.

Why I Never Plan to Go to Africa

 One exacting condition of the environment that we encountered was the constant exposure to disease. Dysentery epidemics were so severe and frequent that we scarcely allowed ourselves to eat any food that had not been cooked or that we had not peeled ourselves. In general, it was necessary to boil all drinking water. We dared not allow our bare feet to touch a floor of the ground for fear of jiggers which burrow into the skin of the feet. Scarcely ever when below 6,000 feet were we safe after sundown to step from behind mosquito netting or to go out without thorough protection against the malaria pests. These malaria mosquitoes which include many varieties are largely night feeders. They were thought to come out soon after sundown. We were advised that the most dangerous places for becoming infected were the public eating houses, since the mosquitoes hide under the tables and attack the diner’s ankles if they are not adequately protected. We rigidly followed the precaution of providing adequate protection against these pests. Disease-carrying ticks were so abundant in the grass and shrubbery that we had to be on guard constantly to remove them from our clothing before they buried themselves in our flesh. They were often carriers of very severe fevers. We had to be most careful not to touch the hides with which the natives protected their bodies from the cold at night and from the sun in the daytime without thorough sterilization following any contact. There was grave danger from the lice that infected the hair of the hides. We dared not enter several districts because of the dreaded tsetse fly and the sleeping sickness it carries. One wonders at the apparent health of the natives until he learns of the unique immunity they have developed and which is largely transmitted to the offspring. In several districts we were told that practically every living native had had typhus fever and was immune, though the lice from their bodies could transmit the disease.

- Isolated & Modern African Tribes, Chapter 9, “Nutrition & Physical Degenaration” by Dr. Weston A. Price  

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